Tuesday, January 20, 2009

Hiddden Horizons 1/20/09


Hard work without talent is a shame, but talent without hard work is a tragedy.

Robert Hall
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Good day lucky one.

Welcome to the fable of the tortoise and the hare.

In my career I had the great pleasure of working with some very talented performers and entertainers. The best ones were those who took their work very seriously. They were the ones who took the script or the songs home every night and went through them finding new levels of meaning and expression, They were dependable, original and very interesting to watch and work with. They defined art and life.

Unfortunately, I have also worked with those who had talent and not much desire to work on it. Those people were not interesting to watch for long and any originality was not often enough to be applauded. The sad fact is that talent unaccompanied and unsupported by hard work eventually, almost without exception, falls into repetition and predictability.

The musician, whether classical or rock. who doesn't pick up his instrument in the morning and practice, doesn't last long.

I have also worked with those who had little or no talent. Some of them had good training and got by on that. Some just admitted defeat and walked away. But others would dig in and work at it, and seemingly get nowhere. After days of mediocre work they would suddenly show up with something real and good. It didn't happen by accident.

Are you a tortoise or a hare? If one has talent and works at it, that's great. If one has no talent and works at it that is also great. Remember the tortoise crossed the finish line first.

If one has talent and does not work at it, it's a tragedy. Unfair in all it's ways.


Posted by DB The Vagabond

May you have such frolic as befits you.

Check out the WINTER QUIZ and the Tuesday Puzzle to follow.

1 comments:
Bucko (a.k.a., Ken) said...
That is the difference between good and great, effort.

2 comments:

Beth said...

You don't get better at what you do unless you practice practice practice!

Bucko (a.k.a., Ken) said...

I take my work very seriously, and often this is misconstrued as arrogance. My intensity can be intimidating at times.